Today I’m going to share some whole foods tips for shopping for breads & grains & saving money.  Start by following the tips in my post Where Do I Shop for Whole Foods.

I am a bread and grain addict.  I LOVE carbohydrates!  Unfortunately, this is where most hidden chemicals are found. Just pick up that loaf of bread you just bought from the store.  It probably has at least 15 ingredients if not more. Not to mention the fact that GMO grains are extremely destructive to your body, causing plethora of health problems many of which we just ignore. Grains naturally have lectins which are not beneficial to those with illnesses and autoimmune diseases. However, I want to address the needs of everyone in this post.

Hopefully you don’t still have pasta mixes or rice kits in your pantry.  You know what I’m talking about–those boxes of Rice-a-Roni, Hamburger Helper, ramen noodles, grains with packets of powdered flavoring.  YUCK!

I’ll give you the benefit of the doubt and say you don’t have them.  So, get on Google and search for the nutritional and ingredient information in one or more of those products.  They contain chemicals so complicated and difficult to pronounce that reading the label makes your eyes cross!

Please, please, please DO NOT purchase those products.  They are in no way, shape, or form genuine food meant for human consumption.  I’m sure you think I sound like some fanatic, but it’s TRUE! They were created in a science lab. Who want wants to eat their biology or chemistry experiment?

You think I don’t understand you, but I truly do.  All you want is a hot, cheesy, creamy, delicious bowl of fettuccini alfredo.  Now, what exactly is in this tasty Italian masterpiece?  Well, generally it should consist of pasta, Italian cheeses, butter, cream, salt, pepper, and garlic.

Now, here is the actual list of ingredients on a boxed and powdered mix: WHEAT FLOUR, PARTIALLY HYDROGENATED PALM OIL, SALT, REDUCED LACTOSE WHEY, CORN SYRUP, PARMESAN, CHEDDAR AND ROMANO CHEESES (COW’S MILK, CHEESE CULTURES, SALT, ENZYMES), NATURAL FLAVORS, WHEY, PALM OIL, SODIUM CASEINATE, AUTOLYZED YEAST EXTRACT, NONFAT MILK, MONOSODIUM GLUTAMATE, LACTIC ACID, DISODIUM INOSINATE, FERROUS SULFATE, NIACIN, SOY LECITHIN, YELLOW 5, YELLOW 6 LAKE, YELLOW 6, THIAMIN MONONITRATE, RIBOFLAVIN, FOLIC ACID.

Sounds appetizing, doesn’t it?!?  I hope you didn’t say yes.  This list of ingredients makes my stomach hurt.  So, I’m a little confused.  If I open the box, all I find is a plastic bag of pasta and a packet of some dusty, powdery substance. Where are my blocks of cheese?  Who puts corn syrup in any dish much less a savory pasta meal?  Why is monosodium glutamate (MSG) in it?  Why is it necessary to add dye?  Folic Acid is not a natural substance and 80% of us do not detox it from or bodies so it builds up and causes inflammation and illness. What is sodium caseinate? Do you see where I am going with this?

Look for pasta with very little ingredients, those that you would have in most kitchens.  Making pasta does not require many ingredients, so look for 100 percent durum organic non-gmo unbleached white or whole wheat flour as the first ingredient.  Sometimes it’s the only ingredient. For those of us who are gluten free, look for 100% quinoa, possibly with the addition of flax. Even better choose a grain alternative that we will discuss below.

This ingredient list for whole grains like brown rice, quinoa, and couscous should simply just be the one main ingredient, i.e. “brown rice” or “quinoa”.

Grains are a whole lot more complicated than what I’ve discussed in this blog post.  I haven’t even touched on GMO wheat, etc., but that’s another topic for another day.  Right now, let’s just focus on taking the baby step of getting rid of the chemicals. When you shop at the store this week for grains and carbs, choose as wisely and simply as possible.

Later on, you may be brave enough to try alternative grains like coconut flour, almond flour, tigernut flour to make breads, pasta, and baked goods, which you can purchase in bulk.

Spaghetti squash, zoodles, and riced cauliflower can easily be purchased in your local grocery store. Begin your transition by trying a family favorite recipe with a twist: spaghetti squash and meatballs in the oven or spaghetti squash cooked in the pressure cooker.

For more information on whole foods and clean eating, you may be interested in reading the following posts:

Whole Foods. It’s Overwhelming!  Where do I Start?
How Do I Shop for Whole Foods?
Where Do I Shop for Whole Foods?
Whole Foods Tips for Shopping for Meat & Saving Money
Whole Foods Tips for Shopping for Dairy and Saving Money

Categories: Clean Eating Shopping Whole Foods

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